Strabismus

Strabismus is a disorder in which both eyes do not line up in the same direction. Therefore, they do not look at the same object at the same time. The condition is more commonly known as ""crossed eyes."" In someone with strabismus, these muscles do not work together. As a result, one eye looks at one object, while the other eye turns in a different direction to focus on another object.

Strabismus surgery loosens or tightens eye muscles, which changes the alignment of the eyes relative to each other. The eye muscles attach to the sclera (wall of the eye). The muscles are covered by a thin layer of transparent tissue called the conjunctiva. The eyelids are held open by a small instrument called a lid speculum. The surgeon incises the conjunctiva to access the eye muscle(s), and uses a delicate hook to isolate the muscle. No skin incisions are made. The eyeball is NOT removed from the eye socket during strabismus surgery.

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